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Today I asked my creative writing students to read a news article and re-write it as a fairy tale.  Here are two that were particularly interesting (in both source material and written product).

Pilot Locked in Bathroom Causes Terror Scare on NY-Bound Plane

In the land of Ciramae there was a mighty dragon that carried peasants from place to place through the air. The dragon was a benevolent brute with scales of steel and a heart of love. On the back of the massive beast rode a small castle. Inside the castle sat rows among rows of luxury mammoth hide chairs for the peasants to sit in. Towards the tail of the dragon was a golden door. Behind the door sat an emerald restroom with toiletry made from the finest materials on earth and a sink made of diamond, decorated with the finest jewels in the universe. Located directly above the head of the dragon was the king’s quarter. The king sat atop golden throne embedded with rubies. The king controlled the dragon from his throne. It was a job only a king could manage.

A very select few may enter the king’s quarters and during the flight the king’s throne must not be disturbed. If the king were to be disturbed during the flight, it is a major offense and is dangerous to the safety of the passengers and the land of Ciramae itself. Ciramaen’s know not to disturb the king while he is guiding a dragon. If the king is disturbed by a human, that human is immediately a threat. Since every Ciramaen knows not to disturb the king, anyone who does disturb him is assumed to be an intruder from a land outside of Ciramae and it is considered to be an act of terrorism.

On a flight from Northern Linacora to New Kory, the king went to the restroom midflight and told his servants to watch over the direction of the dragon while he was gone. Hours passed and the king has yet to return. The servants become nervous and very suspicious of his extended absence but do not leave the king’s quarters in fear of disobeying the king’s orders.

Banging is heard from the golden door in the back of the castle. A peasant heard the banging and approached the door. The banging continued, “Is there anybody in there?” the peasant asked curiously.

“It is your king! I am being held captive by a jammed door knob. I can’t seem to get out!”

The peasant immediately tried to pull the door open. When the door wouldn’t open, the peasant’s worry took over. “Oh! My king! I can’t open the door! I’ll seek help right away!”

The peasant franticly rushed to the king’s quarter and bangs on the door.
“The king is being held captive in the restroom!”

The servants in charge of the king’s duties look at each other with eyes wide. They couldn’t believe what had occurred. Disregarding the peasants cry, the servants became defensive. They immediately landed the dragon, swung open the door and tackled the peasant.

The king could hear the dragon as it landed and out of anger the king kicked the golden door of the restroom down and rushed to the front of the dragon to see his servants in a scuffle with a passenger. He picked both servants up by the backs of their shirts and explained how he was stuck in the bathroom. Dumbfounded, the servants looked at the king with blank minds. The king continued the travels and made the servants spend the rest of the flight in the restroom.

Debt Crisis Divides France and Germany

Once, in a faraway land across the ocean, many mighty kingdoms dotted the land. These kingdoms had, at one time, dedicated themselves to a union of finances that bound the kingdoms peacefully to one another.

It came to pass, however, that many of these kingdoms came to face a crisis. Many causes were attributed to this threat- greedy men and women who spent more than was in their means, the serpentine tempters who led them down that path, the indifferent multitudes who only watched for themselves… From these disgraceful attributes rose a threat that none could ever have foreseen.

The blighted attributes that ruled the lives of these people spawned a living monster. That monster spawned many more. And those monsters spawned more and more, until the lands of the kingdoms were swarming with the putrid beasts. The Pigs, as they were called, scoured the lands, consuming the people’s livelihoods and causing them to wither away from malnourishment and disease, and then feeding off of their misery to spawn more Pigs.

Only two kingdoms remained even relatively safe from the Pigs’ threat, and as the first of their allies declared that they were soon to be completely overrun, the two kings met. Their soldiers were strong an many, and they had repelled the beasts so far, but without the support of their allies they soon would not be able to hold back the tide of Pigs at their nations’ doorsteps. A great debate was held over what could be done, and the two kings argued for many weeks. One king suggested that the forces of the two strong nations could be divided across the land, spread thin to stabilize the situation across the continent. The other saw that plan as folly, however. He declared that to spread out their forces was to doom the people of ALL kingdoms in their land, and that only by staying their course and creating safe havens in their own kingdoms could the Pigs’ threat be defeated. In time he began to doubt his plan, but maintained his steadfast position for the sake of his people, who feared for their own lives and were disgusted at the idea of sacrificing themselves to aid the people who had initially crated this abomination.

It came to pass that the two kings never agreed, that the two kingdoms enacted opposing plans, which divided them, and they both fell; if they had agreed upon one plan or the other, they might have had the combined might to survive….

 

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